SR x MDC: aeforia

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The interview was conducted as part of the SR exhibition “Motion Design, NFTs, and Art.”

The exhibition features Gavin ShapiroaeforiabeyondbolaBlake KathrynSasha KatzAdam PriesterSteven BaltayJames OwensmecceaEsteban DiaconoAlessio De Vecchi, and Render Fruit (click links to view interviews)

Co-organized by SuperRare and Motion Designers Community.


aeforia – 3D Illustrator and Art Director from Montreal, Canada. His work is all about colors, balance, and emotion. Blending surreal landscapes and digital portraiture, he has managed to craft a distinct style over the years and develop a keen eye for details, while focusing on the emotional impact.

Euphyllia
Edition 1 of 1
👁 Get lost in those eyes👁 3D illustration by aeforia, created in 2020. 5000×5000 px

Personally, a good piece of art is one that can transmit an emotion, that can convey an idea or a message… A good piece creates an impact and stands out from the rest… Some artists jump on a visual trend to quickly gain visibility, but I think you can really feel when someone’s work is true to themselves and authentic. 

I don’t think one should refrain themselves from buying assets, but I do think it’s important to use assets in a unique, unexpected and original way. As an example, Beeple said multiple times that he buys 3D models for his work, but he uses these resources like no one does. Same goes for tutorials; it’s absolutely fine to use what you’ve learned to create a new piece, but it’s important to make sure you turn that knowledge into something new and unique, not just a copy of what was presented in the tutorial. 

I don’t think there’s a universal way to distinguish good and mediocre. Art is subjective; you might love a piece so much because of the impact it has on you, but the person next to you could have absolutely no interest in it and might think it just isn’t good at all. However, personally, a good piece of art is one that can transmit an emotion, that can convey an idea or a message… A good piece creates an impact and stands out from the rest. As trends keep changing and evolving, it’s not too difficult to spot a copycat. Some artists jump on a visual trend to quickly gain visibility, but I think you can really feel when someone’s work is true to themselves and authentic. 

What kind of motion design do you think is worth collecting, what should people look for when determining the value?

Most importantly, it’s the kind of work that you can resonate with and that makes you feel something different. Value can also be determined by the artist’s reputation and genuine authenticity in my opinion. 

Instinct
Edition 1 of 1
3D illustration by aeforia, created in 2019. 4000×5000 px
How do you develop your own signature styles?

To me, developing a style is something that takes time. It personally took me years to refine my style and it came naturally, with trial and error, with experimenting. My advice for someone who wants to find their own voice would be to gather all your inspirations together and find elements that you like in each of them. It could be the way a photographer treats their lighting, the style of textures used by a 3D artist you love, the color palette of a piece that had an impact on you, etc. When you have all those elements, pick some of them and try to combine them together and see what happens. You might create something unique and different from these inspirations, who knows! Lastly, to be able to develop your own style, you need to be your own critique and figure out what you can improve in your work. If you feel like you already found your style after your fifth piece, you’re probably doing it wrong. 

What tools do you use?

I mostly use Cinema4D, Octane Render, Marvelous Designer, DAZ Studio and the Adobe Creative Cloud suite. 

Ivy
Edition 1 of 1
3D illustration by aeforia, created in 2019.

My work is very surreal, and abstract at times, but it can be also very introspective. When I create, I feel like the piece has to convey an emotion. If I don’t have a visceral connection to the image I am creating, I don’t consider it as finished and I keep working on it until I get that connection.

What themes/subject matter/topics do you often address in your work?

My work is very surreal, and abstract at times, but it can be also very introspective. When I create, I feel like the piece has to convey an emotion. If I don’t have a visceral connection to the image I am creating, I don’t consider it as finished and I keep working on it until I get that connection. That way, hopefully, the viewer will be able to feel the same way I did when seeing my piece for the first time.

Motion designs’ role in contemporary culture?

With the ever-increasing importance of digital mediums (TV, projections, mobile phones, computers, etc.), I feel like motion design definitely has its place as an important field of work. Moving images are taking advantage of all these mediums and have become ubiquitous in our daily lives, making them undeniably necessary in our contemporary culture. 

The role of social media in your art career? 

Social media had such a huge impact on my career as a digital artist. When I first started creating art on my phone, I felt compelled to share with my friends on Instagram, since I had the app but no interest in sharing pictures of myself or my personal life. So I literally started sharing my work the moment I began my journey as a visual artist. Eventually, I found great communities of artists over time and it reinforced my motivation to share my work and improve myself along the way. I’d say that social media truly helped me so much in getting my work out there and it brought me to meet so many amazing people. 

Should motion design be considered as art or design? What’s the difference between art and design in your opinion?

To me it can be both, visual design, in a simple way, is communicating a message through a visual. We could say that the majority of people has to understand that communicated information for the design to be effective. On the other hand, art is more subjective, it doesn’t need to convey a specific piece of information or communication. It can be visceral and anyone can interpret it in a different way, and motion design can absolutely produce such effects on people. However, the beauty of it is that it can be both art and design at the same time, the spectrum is so wide!

Why do you think motion designs are on average highly valued in the crypto art market?

Because they truly use the full potential of the medium they are being viewed on. Moving images can really strive on the Internet because screens allow us to appreciate them as they are. 

What value has crypto art added to this motion designer community? What do you think of the team up between motion designers & cryptoart?

I think that crypto art is a revolution for motion designers and digital artists. Now, there’s a way to sell a digital piece just like a painting or any traditional medium, which wasn’t possible before. 

What has been your cryptoart experience so far?

It has been great honestly, I learned so much about this space in the past few weeks and I met great people in the process. Really grateful for that! Also, big shout out for the crypto art community for the warm welcome when I first joined the space, much love!

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SuperRare is a marketplace to collect and trade unique, single-edition digital artworks.

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